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  1. #1
    Gregory White
    Guest

    Tweaking does the nose good.

    I just read all the posts in Anie's thread where she posted Stevenson. A few critiqued it as not good while others were highly offended at the hoax.

    This has been done here many times over the years and it does make a good point on one level. One must remember that the majority of the time, their work is being critiqued by writers who are also still learning. So, other than grammatical corrections and personal preference towards an interesting subject matter, what are they truly worth? The pattern seems to show that most of the time, people are saying, "you didn't write it like I would have so I don't like it."

    Certain phrases are not helpful critique:

    "sounds like strangling cats"
    "its been done before"
    "it will never sell"

    So, we must remember that these are not professional critiques --- they are opinions. Not to be unkind, but some of the harshest ones come from the unpublished, and people who are not professional critics, writers or editors.

    True -- if Stephen King, E.M. Forster, Sidney Sheldon and Virginia Woolf all came to dinner and read our works after dessert, all of them would have different critiques and comments. Surely, if THEIR editors were invited as well, there would be a real mess of opinions! Most likely, a few of them would edit Hemingway to the point that he read like Laura Ingalls Wilder!

    However, the thing to remember is to offer genuine advice in a good and giving spirit; not with such malicious words that it wittles at self-esteem. So, unless Forster or Woolf are lurking here on the boards, sometimes these exercises of hoax are good lessons for the writer in all of us. Sometimes, it does a self-important nose good to be tweaked.

    my opinion,
    Greg



  2. #2
    Rogue Mutt
    Guest

    Re: Tweaking does the nose good.

    Are you saying this because you just tried the same stunt as Anie and got busted even quicker?

  3. #3
    Gregory White
    Guest

    Re: Tweaking does the nose good.

    the perfect example shows up first in line. thank you.

  4. #4
    Rogue Mutt
    Guest

    Re: Tweaking does the nose good.

    Oh sorry, I forgot to be constructive in critiquing your plagiarism. Silly me.

  5. #5
    Steven Labri
    Guest

    Re: Tweaking does the nose good.



    GW - You have presented some very good points despite RMs objections and comments (to which I actually enjoy from time to time).

  6. #6
    JC
    Guest

    Re: Tweaking does the nose good.

    I always try to remember that the people critiquing aren't neccessarily "professionals", but at the same time, I figure everyone here probably has one nugget of wisdom that I can benefit from (after all, English wasn't my major in college). I may not take everyone's advice, but I always consider all of it, even if it is delivered in a sarcastic tone.

    Snotty comments don't offend me. What does offend me is when someone is given advice and immediately attacks the person offering it. Don't post if you don't want to hear your writing needs work, you know?

    JC

  7. #7
    R. Radish
    Guest

    Re: Tweaking does the nose good.

    >>>Not to be unkind, but some of the harshest ones come from the unpublished, and people who are not professional critics, writers or editors.

    Is it possible that a published, working professional writer/editor might prefer to post anonymously and omit biographical details because they want their comments to stand alone without being given extra weight or authority simply because they claim to be published?

  8. #8
    Finnley Wren
    Guest

    Re: Tweaking does the nose good.

    Condescending pedantry.

    my opinion,
    Finn

  9. #9
    Gregory White
    Guest

    Re: Tweaking does the nose good.

    oh, I'm sure there are many published talents here as described above. I can't imagine, though, that they are the ones that type out snotty one-line quips -- ones that contribute nothing except showing off someone's mean-streak.

    I've gathered lots of good advice, even from some biting critiques. Critique is great. However, when someone demeans others and tries to disguise it as critique, that is just pitiful, really.

    I believe I've only really "gone off" once after getting such a "one-liner". Let's just say I had already seen a previous pattern of constant, empty, negative abuse and had had enough (on behalf of everyone they'd bitten) of one particular individual.

  10. #10
    LJ Hall
    Guest

    Re: Tweaking does the nose good.

    Of course some of the harshest critics are people who haven't been published. Movie critics aren't filmmakers. Hell, I grew up in community theatre, and everyone knows the harshest opinion of an actor in a show will come from an actor in the audience.

    I'm pretty sure it's understood when people post that what they're going to get back are opinions. You can put up all the unattributed paragraphs from published writers you want to, and it'll always come up the same - some people won't like it, because not all people like all writers.

    Guess what? If your book gets published and read by thousands and reviews in papers, it's going to be the same exact stuff you get here. Book reviewers might be petty because they don't like your particular style. Readers might be fickle because they find the imagery too extensive or bare.

    This forum is practice for the real world, where there are a hell of a lot of Rogue Mutts out there waiting to dislike your stuff.

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