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Thread: LESS IS MORE

  1. #1
    . Bree
    Guest

    LESS IS MORE

    I keep saying that--but there are exceptions. Does anyone agree? For example, my next book is told from three different POVs, and one character in particular speaks in purple prose. (I always write in first person, present tense.)

    Even so, how many here go by the "no more than two qualifiers per sentence" (if possible!)



  2. #2
    Sarah H.
    Guest

    Re: LESS IS MORE

    Bree, I'm a minimalist. I like my writing to be tight and concise. Always when editing, my goal is to reduce the word count. So, yes, less is more.

  3. #3
    Alex Richardson
    Guest

    Re: LESS IS MORE

    To say less is more all the time is a bit silly. You might aswel write a book of blank pages... So long as you aren't waffling, less is well, less.

  4. #4
    Joe Zeff
    Guest

    Re: LESS IS MORE

    I'm another minimalist, but I generally have to raise the word count because my first draft is as tight as tight can be. There are always places in it that I've not described sufficiently, places where I've told instead of shown and so on.

  5. #5
    Sarah H.
    Guest

    Re: LESS IS MORE

    Hey Joe, on another thread somewhere, you said that the Nero Wolfe mysteries were < 55,000 words. I don't think that's true. I know he wrote a number of novellas using the Wolfe cast, but most of the Wolfe stories were > 55,000. I can tell by how long it took me to read them. They were pretty dense. Sarah

  6. #6
    Richard Clunan
    Guest

    Re: LESS IS MORE

    like other cliches, less is more, i'd see as a kind of reference point so you can watch yourself. i dont know what purple prose is but i take it you mean he speaks in fancy sentences? if thats the way he speaks then thats the way he speaks. maybe you can still apply the less is more principle in what of his sentences you choose to put down to illustrate him as a character and to tell the story?

  7. #7
    Joe Zeff
    Guest

    Re: LESS IS MORE

    Yes, they were dense, but look at the page count and compare it to more recent books. For that matter, look at Perry Mason or Doc Savage.

  8. #8
    Kaci Chandler
    Guest

    Re: LESS IS MORE

    I agree with Alex, it's not a "one size fits all" kind of thing, or a set formula for writing tight prose.

    You know what sounds right to you. If speaking in florid, overwrought language is a part of the character's personality, why tamper with it? Some people do speak that way.

    If that style isn't held throughout the book, it'll come through that it is the character speaking, not you.

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