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  1. #1
    KT Stephens
    Guest

    A Father's Reaction

    Situation: A single father has a fourteen year old son who hates the idea that his father wants to move from NY to peadunk Georgia to build a new business.

    A single mother would probably try to coddle some sense into her child before loosing it.

    How do you think the father would deal with him?



  2. #2
    Brady Boyd
    Guest

    Re: A Father's Reaction

    The father might try to involve the son more in the new business, get him excited and share the purpose.

    Brady

  3. #3
    Jerry Hatchett
    Guest

    Re: A Father's Reaction

    Not near enough info to make such a call. Depends on the father, the kid, the relationship between the two, their current situation in NY, the opportunity in GA, and countless other variables.

    j

  4. #4
    Mya Bell
    Guest

    Re: A Father's Reaction

    Wow, that's a tough call with so little information.

    I usually have the characters' personalities built in my head before I decide how a character would react. I would also be thinking about what point I was trying to make vis-a-vis the move and choosing the character reactions to enlarge upon that theme.

    Are you asking because you're not sure what a dad would do or are you asking because you are looking for a few different scenarios in order to choose one that works for this part of the story?

    A little more info might help.

    --- Mya Bell

  5. #5
    KT Stephens
    Guest

    Re: A Father's Reaction

    I'm looking for reactions - and as Mya guessed, different scenarios. But - the boy is white, fourteen, and content with life as he's known it just like any well adjusted happy boy.

    The father is a doctor, with plans and financial backers for a health and wellness retreat in a rural area. Something he's worked for for ten years.

    He's tried involving the kid, but is frustrated by his son's stuborn attitude.

    My personal experience with this situation: the parent remained firm and unsympathetic. It isn't what I want for this character, so I'd like some suggestions if anyone has a thought on this.

  6. #6
    Jerry Hatchett
    Guest

    Re: A Father's Reaction

    In the scenario you describe, I and every other parent I can think of who I personally know would do everything possible to make it pleasant for the boy, and would certainly be sympathetic, but in the end, the boy goes where the parent goes. That's reality of making a living and buying groceries and pesky things like that.

    j

  7. #7
    Liz McGuire
    Guest

    Re: A Father's Reaction

    KT,

    FWIW, I don't remember my reaction that well the first two times we moved (after kindergarden and in the middle of third grade). I remember I was very sad having to leave my best friends. I don't remember talking about it before it happened.

    However, while I was in jr. high school my dad decided to apply for a position in Alaska (we were in Syracuse NY). My recollection is that we (my two brothers and I) weren't asked our opinions before he applied, were just told about it and asked what we thought about moving (should the job be offered). At the same time, we were given info about Alaska - the weather was actually better, you could learn funky languages in high school, etc. Basically, my parents tried to give us info about Alaska and what it might be like living there. They told us why dad had applied for the position. They asked what we thought about it. We knew that in the end it was their decision and we'd go where they went...

    Dunno if that helps, but...

    Liz

  8. #8
    Gary Kessler
    Guest

    Re: A Father's Reaction

    Good question--but not one I really had to worry about. I've moved 38 times in my life. Moved around the world with my parents a good bit and then my children moved around the world with me. All of the children involved learned from an early age that this movement was tied in with how the family earned its living. And, although two generations of parents did take their children's needs into account when the options were there (e.g., both my parents and my wife and I made sure we were in the States for a slug of years while our children were in high school--but made sure we weren't in the States for the elementary years), the children never got even a hint that they had veto power or were going to be bribed to do anything. In both cases, the families moved into war and/or danger zones, and the children trotted right along and faced whatever there was to face as a family unit--without family votes or bribery.

  9. #9
    Terri D
    Guest

    Re: A Father's Reaction

    My situation is pretty much like Gary's in that my husband was in the military so we moved every two years for the first eight years of our marriage. When he retired and got a real job we moved again one last time. Our children weren't given the option to say yay or nay...they were children (and still are). Of course my children are very adaptable and never had a problem adjusting to their new homes or schools or friends.
    My husband misses moving all the time and every now and then says he's ready to relocate...I just tell him...good luck.

    ;-)

  10. #10
    Mya Bell
    Guest

    Re: A Father's Reaction

    It's interesting hear people's different life reactions to moving and how many have moved a great deal.

    The first time we moved, I was two years and three months. I didn't mind that move. It was kind of excitingf. I remember my mother taking down the red gingham curtains from the kitchen when we left the first house and unpacking the little red wagon at the new place (and admonishing me not to leave it outside).

    I missed the apple tree we had at the old place but the new place was bigger and had a bigger yard. I liked that. It had an oak tree as well and I picked up acorns that fall (a very fun thing when you've just turned three--there are cool bugs in some of them). Then we moved again, just after I turned thirteen.

    I hated it. Hated, hated, hated it.

    I didn't tell my parents I hated it. I wasn't given any choice or asked for my opinion and I bore it the same way I bore everything in my childhood--I accepted that I had no choice and made the best of it. I wasn't the kind of kid who grumbled. But I was entitled to my thoughts.

    We didn't move for financial reasons. My parents just wanted to be in a different kind of neighborhood with more "conventional" houses and people.

    I can relate to the boy in the story about not wanting to move. We moved from a place where there were acres and acres of beautiful trees and shrubs. There were quail and pheasants and dogs that roamed free, pigeons, raccoons, snakes, lizards, apple orchards, plum trees, blackberries. There was always something to discover. Something to watch--a tree to climb--a fort to build. There were myriad fields of poppies and snake flowers (camus, I think).

    It really was heaven. I was never happier and I was never fitter, because I roamed for miles as often as I could. I had the strength and endurance of someone who worked out every day, except that it was effortless. We didn't live out in the country--it was in the city, so all the city conveniences were there too. It just wasn't developed in the same cookie-cutter way new neighborhoods are designed. And the old house was big--high ceilings, lots of rooms and hidey places, a place for privacy, places to run.

    The new place. Ugh. Everything fenced. Every lawn perfect. Every lot filled. It was a "good" neighborhood--utterly sanitized. The park didn't have trees. It was a flat square of grass. There were no pheasants or flickers, no quail or snowberries, no oaks or broom to bloom and snap in the fall. There was nowhere I could run, no paths to roam, no trees to climb, no apples to pick, no fawns to discover in the spring, no eggs hatching, no lizards skittering under rocks.

    Desolate, in my opinion. I had a hard time staying fit in that neighborhood. Who wants to walk around on concrete all day looking at people's houses behind their fences. Not much motivation in that. Running through deer trails and climbing trees to spy on your siblings is much more fun. Couldn't do that here. We basically ended up watching TV all the time because there was nothing more interesting to do.

    Good neighborhood. My parents loved it. There wasn't a day that went by when they didn't talk about how happy they were that we had moved. I don't know what they saw in the house. It was small, cramped, designed like a box, noisy, stuff broke all the time--not well-made like the older house.

    So, you're a kid. You have no choice, no voice. You endure and dream every day about when you can leave home and choose your own path. At least that's the way it was for me.

    So, I don't know what the dad in your story would do, probably the same as mine. But I can certainly relate to the little boy. I don't know how much of his interior life you plan to explore or reveal in the story, but there's a glimpse of what moving was like for me.

    --- Mya Bell

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