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Thread: " " or ' "

  1. #11
    Ryan Bruner
    Guest

    Re: ''

    Actually, quoting a phrase within dialog doesn't really make a lot of sense. Someone can't SPEAK quotes unless they verbalize them...in which case, you would put that in the dialog. So, I think Carol O's second example would never REALLY make much sense. Quotes within quotes really only works if a character is re-stating something someone else said.



  2. #12
    Queen V
    Guest

    Re: ''

    Okay, where's that copy of "eats shoots and leaves"???

  3. #13
    Carol O
    Guest

    Re: ''

    Maybe missed your point, Ryan, but I find it hard to believe that you've never verbally emphasized a spoken word to draw attention to it.

    "I can't stand all this 'politically correct' nonsense."

    "It's pretty, but is it 'art'?"

    "Get your 'restoration project' out of the garage before I call a tow truck!"

  4. #14
    HenLit Writer
    Guest

    Re: ''

    I suggest ditching the quotes and just write: Cindy was the good dog of the pack.

    Hen

  5. #15
    Terri D
    Guest

    Re: ''

    double quote marks are for dialogue. The way Carol used the quotes is correct.

  6. #16
    Ryan Bruner
    Guest

    Re: ''

    Carol:

    You can verbally emphasize...but you use italics to do that. If someone intends to quote, they either physically show this or say something like:

    "I can't stand all this quote politically correct unquote nonsense."

    That is how it would be said verbally. Putting single quotes in an actual quote when you aren't actually quoting someone is taking something audible and trying to make it visual. It doesn't work.

    In those cases, you would be better off just dropping the single quote altogether.

    Anyhow, I just looked up a couple references (though, not Chicago Manual of Style) and they both say that double-quotes should be used as indicated in the original question, and as Wonky stated. Single quotes are ONLY to be used when someone's dialog quotes someone else. (Again, in British, it is the opposite.)

  7. #17
    leslee
    Guest

    Re: ''

    Really good question and excellent responses. I'd probably go with " " and take my chances.

  8. #18
    Robert Raven
    Guest

    Re: ''

    Be aware that this usage in the U.K. is exactly opposite of its usage in the U.S.

    RR

  9. #19
    Ryan Bruner
    Guest

    Re: ''

    RR:

    One site that mentioned this said that while the opposite is typical in the U.K., the U.K. accepts either form...the U.S. version or the opposite version. Perhaps this is a result of more and more American books crossing over into the U.K.

  10. #20
    HenLit Writer
    Guest

    Re: ''

    I work with non-fiction publishers and copy editors, and here's their take on the use of quotes. Except for obvious usage (dialogue) try to avoid using apologetic quotes, such as

    Cindy was the 'good dog' in the pack.

    My editor would delete the quotes and she wouldn't italicize the word either. The sentence conveys the tone of the author's message nicely and doesn't need elaboration.

    Hen.

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