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  1. #1
    Tracy
    Guest

    Sorry ... another 'am i the only one' post

    After weeks of working diligently on "Haywire" this morning found me crawling out bed sick to death of the damned thing. Couldn't bear the thought of tweaking or writing. Suddenly feel as if I'm utterly sapped creatively and it scares the hell out of me. Anyone else go through this?



  2. #2
    Lisa J. Werth
    Guest

    Re: Sorry ... another 'am i the only one' post

    Yep, take a break for a few days, or you might regret or miss something.

  3. #3
    Reese
    Guest

    Maybe if you changed the name?

    Actually, changing the name would be a very good idea because 'Haywire' has already been done - and made into a movie no less. Don't know about your 'sick to death of the thing,' thing but any writer who works at his/her craft long enough will, like a marathon runner, hit a wall. Maybe you've been working on it for too long. Make some notes to remind you of your train of thought, stuff it in a drawer for a month or two, and go on to something else. Highly charged stories can be physically draining for an author. You can suffer a serious psychological, emotional, and physical burnout. If you are deeply involved in a particularly tense or emotionally charged story, it can change your own personality. It's not really all that unusual. The best remedy is to '... step away from the book. Put down the book and step away.'

    Give yourself some debriefing time then go back to it refreshed. It will also help your creative juices is you regularly allow yourself some time (COMPLETELY) away from the keyboard doing real people things. Go to a bar or something. Get in touch with the rest of the world. You might even find some ideas among the normals to help you with your writing.

    Whatever you do, in spite of the prevailing 'wisdom', don't try to force yourself to write when you feel 'sick to death' of it. It won't help you work through the block. You'll just start to resent the manuscript.


    Reese

  4. #4
    Tracy
    Guest

    Re: Maybe if you changed the name?

    Great advice, Reese. Thanks very much. Think I will take a break ... and tonight feels like a fine night to hit a bar (as you suggested) and have myself a martini.

    "Haywire" has been done? Made into a movie? Crap.

    I was aware of a Rita Hayworth bio that came out sometime in the 80s called "Haywire," but nothing else. Can we be talking about the same thing?

  5. #5
    Lois
    Guest

    Re: Maybe if you changed the name?

    Tracy -- Take a few days off. Read some books you've been dying to devour. Then open your file to any page into your novel, and start reading. It might sound weird, but it works. You'll start to think of the events that led up to that scene, what comes after, what work you have left to do, and your batteries will be recharged. Long walks help, too. We all go through the "I hate the darn book and never want to look at it again" syndrome. Sometimes more than once during the creation.

    Hang in there!

    Lois

  6. #6
    Lindi
    Guest

    Re: Maybe if you changed the name?

    You might try picking one character and doing an in-depth profile. Always helps me get past the "yucks."

  7. #7
    Tracy
    Guest

    Re: Maybe if you changed the name?

    Man, I just love you guys....(sigh)

  8. #8
    Franny T
    Guest

    inspiration

    I've been in a slump for weeks, but recently went to a book reading/signing where, in response to a question, the author said she always writes at least 500 words a day and cited Graham Green (sho did the same) as her inspiration. Since then, I've been trying (not always successfully) to churn out those 500 words every day, even if I go back and delete or change most of it the next day. Just pushing on through the next bit of dialogue or the next scene can help you get around the corner and see where the next turn of the plot is headed or just get a new idea.

  9. #9
    Mary M.
    Guest

    Re: inspiration

    Wasn't Hayware the name of the movie about the horrendous drug-inspired Charles Manson murders?

  10. #10
    Lisa J. Werth
    Guest

    Haywire Films & Books

    After doing searchs at Amazon and google.

    I have come across an autobiography that was turned into a book by Brooke Hayward - both are titled Haywire.

    THere is a 1937 movie called Hotel Haywire

    Haywire, a novel of suspense by James Mills

    and another comedic novel, Haywire by Eric Chappell

    plus a few bands use the name.

    Mary M. - I think Helter Skelter is the Manson murder book and movie, of course that's the one I remember a friend reading. Chances are there are others.

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