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  1. #1
    M T
    Guest

    any morticians out there?

    Odd question I know but, does anyone know what happens to a body in preperation for burial? Are the organs removed? In particular, is the heart taken out? Is the body left as an empty shell of bone and skin or is something stuffed into it to keep the shape?

    Gross huh?! lol.



  2. #2
    Lindi Hobbs
    Guest

    Re: any morticians out there?

    LoL -- the questions writers ask, LoL! I don't know the answer, but have you Googled it yet?

  3. #3
    Jack Hinks
    Guest

    Re: any morticians out there?

    Good heavens, I think you're confusing embalming with mummification. And maybe with abuse of corpse...

    -- JH

  4. #4
    Jack Hinks
    Guest

    First hit at Google got this...

    1. The body is completely undressed.
    2. The limbs are gently stretched and massaged to lessen the effects of the relentless rigor mortus.
    3. The body is washed.
    4. An artery and vein in either the neck, armpit, or groin are cut open and all the corpse's blood is drained out. This is usually done on a table with gutters that drain to a receptacle of some sort.
    5. The veins are filled with embalming fluid. This is a formaldehyde-based liquid that, ironically, looks like blood. (This is coincidental, not aesthetically intentional.)
    6. A large syringe is inserted into the navel and the contents of the stomach and abdomen are pumped out.
    7. The abdomen is filled with between 8 and 10 pints of embalming fluid.
    8. Cups or pads are placed over the eyeballs to prevent a sunken look and the eyelids are sewn shut. Any necessary reconstructive work is performed.
    9. The body is attended to cosmetically: The hair is washed and set on women; the beard is shaven on men. Makeup is applied to both the face and neck and hands.
    10. The body is dressed. Usually the family provides something for the deceased to wear but, if necessary, the funeral home has a wide selection of inexpensive, paper-like clothing.
    11. The body is placed in the coffin and arranged for viewing. The hands are manipulated so as to have a natural fall, and religious items are sometimes placed in the hands.
    --The above was taken from "THE ODD INDEX" By Stephen J. Spignesi.

  5. #5
    Gary Kessler
    Guest

    Re: First hit at Google got this...

    Several cases of late of posters apparently having no concept of what Google can do to help them. We usually have Kaz googling for people a couple of times a day. You'd think that simple research techniques would eventually sink in--it's not as if research isn't a basic element of writing.

  6. #6
    M T
    Guest

    Re: First hit at Google got this...

    Lindi - it's funny, I didn't even think about doing a google search, my first instinct was to come here! lol.

    Wow thanks Jack! Funny thing, I was sort of hoping the heart would have been removed because I've written a really great paragraph about placing a 'pleading for love' poem in my father's breast pocket as he lay in his casket, and then realising his heart was not even there anymore. Now I'll have to change it, although since it's nonfiction, I could simply write that my *thoughts* were wandering over the possibility that his heart was no longer there... OK! Back to work. Thanks!

  7. #7
    M T
    Guest

    Re: First hit at Google got this...

    Oh hi Gary, I see you are your usual lovable self today. Oh well, I can't be bothered, I'm having a GREAT writing day. See ya!

  8. #8
    RBSA
    Guest

    Re: First hit at Google got this...

    Jack -- you missed a few oddities, although you are to be forgiven as it is very morbid what Westerners do to bodies after they expire (such as use fishhook like wires to wire the mouth shut.)

    The best bet is to read the book by Darryl Roberts who is a good friend of mine (but HATED by the death care industry) called PROFITS OF DEATH. The first chapter alone will stun you -- he describes the answer to your question -- and then the rest of his expose' is about how the bereaving survivors are ripped off by the funeral home industry.

    IF these facts are in any way important to your story (and aren't they all?) then you MUST get them right or not include them at all. But the book (or read it at the library). An ounce of authenticity outweighs a ton of BS.

    RBSA
    (Yes, my first post in a few months.)

  9. #9
    Gary Kessler
    Guest

    MT

    LoL. I presume your acknowledgement section is going to be longer than the text for this book--not just research, but we get to rewrite each sentence for you as you go along. :-)

  10. #10
    M T
    Guest

    stealing from the dead

    Oh no! I've been dragged into WN and I can't get out! HELP!

    Hi RBSA, I don't think we've met. The original question was mine BTW. Your post reminded me of a book I read about a mortician family in the States, who actually pulled out the gold fillings from the teeth of corpses. They also stole the dead people's jewelry. Much of their source for bodies came from old age homes, their embalming room had corpses piled on shelves, propped against walls.... And they couldn't be bothered to cremate bodies seperately, so they stuffed the ovens, then distributed the ash among several urns to be handed over to grieving relatives. It's really awful and makes me worry about what will happen to my own loved ones (or myself).

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