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  1. #11
    d brown
    Guest

    Re: Really Writing is passion

    I can't agree more. I can have a million ideas in a day, but when it comes to actually getting any of them down on paper, I might get two or three.



  2. #12
    d brown
    Guest

    Re: Really Writing is passion

    That last post seems confusing where it was placed. It was intended in response to Thomas' first post.

  3. #13
    Glen T. Brock
    Guest

    Re: Really Writing is passion

    Thomas,

    You are still concentrating on how you write. What do you write? Why do you write? Without knowing those other two factors your writing is like that Moebus drawing. Maybe you will get it and maybe you won't.

    If I may let me draw an analogy from your legal background. Structure without craft is like forensic accounting. Finding passion in what you write is like orchestrating a defense in an important case, using the forensic accounting to substantiate your position. Both are admittedly neccessary but what is factual is not neccessarily truth.

    So it is with writing.

    Glen T. Brock

  4. #14
    Thomas H. Johnson
    Guest

    Last post of this thread-Explanation

    I intend this to be the last post on this subject.

    I appreciate the responses Glen. I anticipated more members posting to this thread.

    I have five stories in my head at this moment; two legal thrillers, two historical novels and one nonfiction. I will share my storylines with you in due time but the topic of this Forum is Writing Craft. My comments were specifically meant for this topic.

    Now I feel I have beaten my dead horse...

    Thomas H. Johnson

  5. #15
    Lindi
    Guest

    Re: Last post of this thread-Explanation

    Writing-writing really is hard work. It's like my son's drum set. He's been practicing every day since he was eight years old, and now, at 11, he's very good. His friends stop by, see the drums and announce that they too want to play drums. They pound away with the sticks for a few minutes and realize,"Hey, drumming's hard!" and they quit. Same for writing. Lots of people announce they're writing a book, but when they get past the fun part of scribbling out a few lines, get critted and realize, "Hey, you mean the book won't just fall out of my brain like magic?" they get frustrated. Maybe even give up. I'd write more, but MUST run. Time to take that 11 year old to skule. Take care.

  6. #16
    Glen T. Brock
    Guest

    Re: Last post of this thread-Explanation

    Thomas,

    You're not beating a dead horse at all! I'm not interested in storylines as my own keep me very busy.

    The genres you have mentioned are sophisticated and could be difficult. I have little wonder why you consider the craft difficult. Both legal thrillers and historical fiction require good documentation. I remember once, when reading a novel by C.S. Forrester, I thought I had caught the author in a time line mistake. This was a Hornblower novel, set during the Napoleonic wars, and in one chapter Forrester specifically mentions the use of a telegraph in transferring a message from Liverpool to London. "Ahah!" says me. "The telegraph was not invented until 1842! The master has made a mistake!" Mr. Forrester said nothing. He didn't have to. 'Telegraphs' during that period of history referred to a system of semephore stations, strategically built along the road from Liverpool to London. They used flags instead of dots and dashes to speed the messages along.

    Legal thrillers have always fascinated me. I suppose because the natural state of drama that exists for that genre. Although I doubt if you would get tripped up on the proceedures, being in the legal profession already, but it can happen. I was sitting in city court one day, waiting to testify against a shoplifter, when a man and woman were brought before the judge, charged with a variety of sexually oriented charges. It seems a policeman had caught the couple, red handed (so to speak),engaged in sexual intercourse inside a parked car. Not only is that illegal, it is embarrassing. When the judge called the man forward to hear the charges, the man was very embarrassed. The judge asked him how he pleaded to the charges and the defendent saw his opportunity to regain some of his dignity. With a straight face and a loud voice the man announced "I pleads no load compadre, your honor!"

    Thomas, thank you for an interesting discussion. I wish that more had contributed to it also. Good luck with your writing.

    Best wishes,

    Glen T. Brock

  7. #17
    T. L. E.
    Guest

    Re: Thomas

    You made an excellent point and I think most people who read it are saying 'So true.' I'm back three years from you. I'm writing that first novel and realizing how different crafting a novel is from just writing what pops into your head. I'm excited by the idea that it is much more complex and puzzling than most people think it is. Of course the idea that I'd type out the novel and send it out the door and sell it was a pleasant daydream. But sometimes it is great in life to realize you don't know all there is to know about something, that you have a lot to learn, and look forward to the journey.

    TLE

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