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  1. #1
    A. L. Gerard
    Guest

    Stupid (?) question

    I've consulted my various grammar manuals, but I can't seem to find the answer to this question: how does one type an "also known as" notation. For example, what is the proper way to type

    "The city of Boston (a.k.a. Beantown) is on the banks of the River Charles."

    Where do the commas go? Periods? Can anyone provide guidance? Thanks.



  2. #2
    Bob Kellogg
    Guest

    A guess

    I've always seen it capitalized, with no periods, as in:

    The city of Boston (AKA Beantown) is on the banks of the River Charles.

    or

    The city of Boston, AKA Beantown, is on the banks of the River Charles.

    Bob K.

  3. #3
    John
    Guest

    Re: A guess

    According to the on-line Webster dictionary, also known as should be aka. Small letters, no periods.

  4. #4
    murg
    Guest

    Re: A guess

    back in the olden days, when I worked for (yuck) lawyers, legal pleadings used "aka".

  5. #5
    Gary Kessler
    Guest

    U.S. publishers style

    The dominant U.S. publishing style is to use Webster's Collegiate as the abbreviation authority. Webster's renders it lowercase, no peridos: aka

  6. #6
    A. L. Gerard
    Guest

    Re: U.S. publishers style

    Okay. Thanks. So there's no comma after aka? Sorry to be so confused.

  7. #7
    Gary Kessler
    Guest

    Re: U.S. publishers style

    No, no comma, because there wouldn't be one in what it represents: Also knowns as Beantown. (You wouldn't put a comma between "as" and "Beantown," now would you?)

  8. #8
    Bob Kellogg
    Guest

    Thanks, John, Gary and murg.

    aka it is. Sounds like someone clearing his throat, though. Or perhaps a Hawaiian word that snuck into the language.

    Bob K.

  9. #9
    Roy Abrahams
    Guest

    Re: Thanks, John, Gary and murg.

    Although not listed in any botanical dictionary or even a dictionary of the English language, "aka" is a little-known plant that grows high in the Andes mountains. It was first discovered during America's Civil war when a regiment belonging to General Lee got turned around during one of the lesser battles. They eventually found themselves in unfamiliar territory and surrounded by near naked Andeans from whose mouths poured a strangely colored fluid. The U.S. boys stared in disgust and more than one emitted a stifled "ack." The Andeans, thinking the men spoke their language, laughed and whooped and in no time had the soldiers dining as guests in their huts covered with aka leaves. Aka berries were passed around in large woven baskets and soon the viscuous fluid was dribbling down the chins of the perplexed soldiers. They got along fine with the natives, conversing easily as the only word spoken in that village was "aka."

    This little bit of history is as unknown as the aka plant, probably due to the psychogenic properties of the berries.

  10. #10
    murg
    Guest

    Re: Thanks, John, Gary and murg.

    Acck! she croaked!

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