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  1. #1
    Picture Book
    Guest

    Fog, smog and mist

    What is the difference between fog, smog and mist and what would an effective description be for each?


    e.g. Smog = pea-souper
    Mist = haze



  2. #2
    Keith Blount
    Guest

    Re: Fog, smog and mist

    Fog is thick and rolls in so that the distance becomes obscured (sometimes so much that it feels as though you're standing under the only light in a greyed-out world), smog is associated with pollution (I see it every time I drive back into London), and mist is finer and wetter than fog, often associated with early morning (on moors etc). As for descriptions, you might want to dig out the Dickens (actually I'm reading Pasternak's Dr Zhivago at the moment and there are some great weather descriptions in there too). That you are asking this shows you have been away from the UK too long!
    All the best,
    Keith

  3. #3
    F Walter
    Guest

    Re: Fog, smog and mist

    The <u>Fog</u> is a book by James Herbert!
    <u>Smog<u/> is cat with an S whose name begins with an S!
    And <u>Mist</u> is when you been gone away to long!
    Fran.

  4. #4
    Pat Cooper
    Guest

    Re: Fog, smog and mist


    I would add to Keith's excellent descriptions, that while fog and mist are natural weather phenomena, smog is man-induced.

    patC

  5. #5
    Picture Book
    Guest

    Re: Fog, smog and mist

    Fog is thick and rolls in so that the distance becomes obscured (sometimes so much that it feels as though you're standing under the only light in a greyed-out world)

    Love that!




    Hi Pat! I like Irish Mist every now and then....

  6. #6
    Picture Book
    Guest

    Re: Fog, smog and mist

    Fran & Keith, your threads are not showing...weird......must be the smog.

  7. #7
    Jordie
    Guest

    Re: Fog, smog and mist

    Fog sometimes doesn't roll at all, but hangs very high in the air (at least it does around San Francisco) so that it is like a high white blanketing cloud cover. If you're lucky, the fog burns off by noon.

    Jordie

  8. #8
    Russ Still
    Guest

    Re: Fog, smog and mist

    Here's the official aviation definitions:

    Fog is condensed water vapor and occurs whenever the temperature of air equals the dewpoint. Essentially, a cloud on the ground. There are a number of types of fog: advection, radiation, upslope, blah, blah, but that's probably much more than u wanted.

    Smog is a fog-like condition visually, but is not fog in the meteorological sense. It can be a mixture of smoke and fog like u might see near a fire in otherwise foggy conditions. Or it can be a mixture of gases, primarily the products of internal combustion engines, that are so concentrated that they turn the air a brownish color (especially when seen horizontally from the air).

    Mist is very light rain composed of relatively small droplets. Rain or mist that evaporates before it hits the ground is termed virga.

    Fog and mist attenuate short distance visibility. Smog attenuates long distance visibility.

  9. #9
    Eric Mettenich
    Guest

    Re: Fog, smog and mist

    No they've been mist

    Eric

  10. #10
    Yvonne Oots
    Guest

    Re: Fog, smog and mist

    Fog is that wall you run into on the freeway, so everyone behind you can run into you.
    Smog is any city in southern california.
    Mist is a light rain that hovers in the air, just after you have spent an hour or two doing your hair, so it can gently pour down on you and mess it all up.
    Yvonne
    Hope this helps Picture.
    Jamensons is better.

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