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  1. #11
    Bob Kellogg
    Guest

    Daphne, you're right.

    The word count your word processor produces is accurate enough. Everyone involved knows that the only reason the publisher needs to know the word count is because the cost of printing the book depends on how many pages it contains. That, in turn, depends on the layout and font style and size they use. It's not only a design decision, it's a business decision. You're just the author.

    A ballpark esitmate of word count, as Daphne said, is accurate enough, and you get that from Word or WP. Turn your attention to things that really need it.

    Bob K.



  2. #12
    Gary Kessler
    Guest

    Re: Daphne, you're right.

    Bob's right. All you need by way of a word count is something as close as your word processing program word count gives you (and they all use slightly different formulas). The actual finished book pages your manuscript will require depends on a whole string of design decisions the publisher would have to make. Their production people have the formulas for coming up with such an estimate on the basis of the various design mixes the publisher uses--so just leave it to them to estimate the final book page count. It really has nothing to do with the submission phase or you.

  3. #13
    Daphne
    Guest

    Re: Daphne, you're right.

    Cool beans. I'm glad to have it in black and white in yours and Gary's posts because this is one topic that never seems to die.

    Daphne

  4. #14
    Gordon Mc Robbie
    Guest

    Re: Daphne, you're right.

    It has always amazed me that Gutenberg did his stuff in the fifteenth century and there is still no standard way of counting the words.

    Gordon

  5. #15
    Bob Kellogg
    Guest

    Standard way of counting..

    Gordon, you forgot what we in the computer industry have always called "the brute-force method." You can actually count every word. An astoundingly useless thing to do, but if accuracy is crucial, there it is.

    Of course, you'd need to do it at least two times --once from the front to the back and the other back to front. If the count agrees, you're through and can write down the number with the satisfaction of a job well done.

    If they don't agree...well, that's why we don't do it that way anymore. Takes more iron-willed concentration than most of us have. But somehow those old-timers used to do it.

    Breathtaking to realize what giant brains those people had.

    Bob K.

  6. #16
    T. A. Nelson
    Guest

    Re: Standard way of counting..

    No, no, no. Don't count the words. Just count the spaces between them. As they are smaller they are much easier to count. Usualy there is one space per word. Then you must subtract the number of periods because each period causes one extra space if you are double spacing after each period. Question marks figure into this business as well.

    Anyway, this answer contains exactly 67 words.

  7. #17
    Elaine
    Guest

    Re: Standard way of counting..

    Could someone please tell me how to count lines in a document in Word 2002 which would not include blank lines. In the Help section, in one place, I have found where it says you can set it to not include blank lines. But that is all it says. It does not tell you how. I have searched manuals, the internet, and have yet to get an answer.

    Can you help me?

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