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  1. #11
    Bly Oxford
    Guest

    Re: "...he retorted feelingly...." (patC)

    Maybe this writer is a recovering music composer. “With feeling” is a direction for music tempo. I suspect, no I know, that is the reason one will never find a footprint of mine on the path to music greatness. Most of my pieces were annotated with “slowly with feeling” when my contemporar-ies directed “brightly with a rock beat.” I finally said feelingly, “To heck with it, there’s always writing.” Guess what—there’s more genres in writing than there are tempos in music, and publishers are unfeelingly choosing other genres over mainstream. “Well, there’s always macramé or basket weaving,” she said hopefully.
    Bly



  2. #12
    Jen Nipps
    Guest

    Re: "...he retorted feelingly...." (Colleen)

    Yes, 12. And this really is the first time I've seen something that I thought was questionable.

    OK, I might as well say it's Mercedes Lackey.

    ~Jen

  3. #13
    Tovia Perls
    Guest

    Re: "...he retorted feelingly...." (Colleen)

    "I have seen the road to hell, and it is paved with adverbs."
    Stephen King, 'On Writing'

  4. #14
    Jen Nipps
    Guest

    Re: "...he retorted feelingly...." (Colleen)

    Thank you for that! I knew I had seen something like it but I couldn't think of what it was.

    ~Jen

  5. #15
    K A Barnett
    Guest

    Re: "...he retorted feelingly...." (Colleen)

    Hi All, just signed on....As for your topic, I am reading Willis' NOT TO MENTION THE DOG and noticed that she uses adverbs liberally (no pun intended) but I thought it was her British heritage.

  6. #16
    Ron Starkey
    Guest

    Re: "...he retorted feelingly...." (Colleen)

    Jen,

    Could it be this was her early book? You know, the one she got published before the editors woke up? Your comments are interesting to me, in part, because just this evening, my son and I were discussing the importance of finding the "right" word in a sentence so as not to distract the reader from the story. This was a great example that I will share with him tomorrow. (And I shall do so feelingly.)

    Ron

  7. #17
    Beverly
    Guest

    Re: "...he retorted feelingly...." (Colleen)

    She sounds like a former paperback romance writer. Publishers of paperback romances love the use of adverbs in dialogue, as do most of the writers, and the sillier the better.

  8. #18
    Jen Nipps
    Guest

    Re: "...he retorted feelingly...." (Ron)

    No, actually it's her newest one. It was/is a very good read, but the use of "feelingly" in that context two time is what got to me.

    ~Jen

  9. #19
    RBSA
    Guest

    Re: "...he retorted feelingly...." (Ron)

    Jen -- In a prior post, someone asked a similar question. My response was brilliant, but you may have missed it.

    "Hunt down adverbs and kill them where they lurk. English speakers use them becuase we usually want to convey a message quickly, but in writing, they are pure evil. Almost anything that can be said with an adverb can be said better without it. And, it's usually 1) a sign of weak writing and 2) a lost opportunity. Why?

    "He ran crazily down the street." Someone might write such a thing. But what does "crazily" mean? The manner in which he was running or what he was doing while running (or both?) If it's important (and it must be, since you wrote it!) you need to make it worthwhile for the reader.

    "I've got termites in my pants," the man screamed as he ran past us.

    "Funny thing. He wasn't wearing pants," I said.

    [or]

    The man had a toaster oven under his arm and hopped like a rabbit as he passed us.

    I like those two better than the first. Depending on the story, of course."

    RBSA

  10. #20
    Sis
    Guest

    Re: "...he retorted feelingly...."

    Hi Jen--I can't add anything not already said, but I wanted to add that I noticed the liberal use of 'ly' words in Harry Potter. Just when I think I am using less 'ly' and 'ing' I read a published author using more.
    Go figure!

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