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Thread: another word

  1. #1
    Bly Oxford
    Guest

    another word

    Help! Again, I have a word or name buzzing about in my head and I can't find the exact meaning or Americanized pronunciation. What does the Italian word PAISANO mean in plain English? I thought it meant friend, but the Italian word for friend is l'amico ( or something to the effect--I left that on the web page.} Thanks
    Bly



  2. #2
    Brian H
    Guest

    Re: another word

    Just a guess, but it looks like same roots as 'peasant'.
    I have an Italian friend, I'll ask him later...

  3. #3
    Gioacchino (Jack) Giampapa
    Guest

    Re: another word

    Bly:

    A loose translation would be "countryman", someone from Italy or of Italian heritage. If I'm wrong my name ain't,
    Gioacchino Nigrelli Giampapa

  4. #4
    Bly Oxford
    Guest

    Re: another word

    Thank you, Brian and Jack. Jack, i might just use Giampapa as a name instead of Torricelli, the first name that popped into my mind when the story started through the first sifter--in fact now that I have typed it, Giampapa looks more like my character than does Torricelli. Do you mind?
    Bly

  5. #5
    Gioacchino (Jack) Giampapa
    Guest

    Re: another word

    Bly:

    In as much as it is my family name and it will stop with my, (alas, a daughter, no son) I would take it as the highest compliment. I do hope you write fiction so you can utilize a little literary license and make the character, handsom, virile, strong, of unquestionable character and attractive to women. If you write non-fiction your character will have to be... well, lets just hope it's going to be fiction. Good luck.

    Gioacchino (Jack) Giampapa

  6. #6
    Bly Oxford
    Guest

    Re: another word

    Jack, My character once had all the good attibutes you listed, but alas, he is now someone whose appearance scares children until they discover that indeed he is a hero. If you can convince an editor to let me have just a wee bit more space, I'll happily turn Mr. Giampapa back to his once handsome, urbane, charming kindly self, but I'm afraid I don't have the space to go through plastic surgery. So I'll just have to let them love the heroic Mr. Giampapa as he is. I listed every word I could think of that is the least bit synonymous with countryman, kinsman, fellow traveler, etc., but I cannot find a translation for paisano. I might have to find another word. Sometimes my serendipity no longer works.
    thanks again. Bly

  7. #7
    Gioacchino (Jack) Giampapa
    Guest

    Re: another word

    Bly:

    Having grown up in a household that spoke Italian over the years I have all but lost the ability to communicate in the world's most beautiful language and am left only with the ability to say the very seldom used phrase; Hey, when did bras start unhooking in the front?"
    Being the helpful little devil that I am however I tore my house apart looking for my English to Italian dictionary. I found a "I Like Ike" button, and a large assortment of divorce papers that brought back painful and expensive memories, but I digress. To double check the dictionary I called my sister, (who ya gonna believe, family or a stranger who wrote a dictionary) who spend a great deal of time in Italy and is fluent in the language of my forefathers. Both concur, the word, "paesano" (correct spelling but the word is usually pronounced without the 'o') is the common word for 'villager' or 'countryman'. HA! See that, I was right!
    Please note: The word paesano when used to denote 'villager' is in no way to be construed in the same use as, "It take a village to raise a child". We Italians take care of our own and do not need those who would starve to death if locked in a supermarket overnight to tell us how to raise our kids. Please keep that in mind when writing what I know will be your bestseller.
    I hope this has been helpful.

    Sincerely,
    Gioachino (Jack) Giampapa

  8. #8
    Sully Magma
    Guest

    Re: another word

    Hi Bly,
    I thougt "Paisano" or "Paisan" was the same as "comrad," as in the Russian countryman, or "Partisan" of French origin? Just thought I'd drop in a couple more complexities to soothe your searching mind.
    --sully

  9. #9
    Bly Oxford
    Guest

    Re: another word

    Sully, thanks, but Jack has written my story for me. I simply needed an explanation of the word paisan that could be explained to children. I can use countryman very well, plus the fact if I use Jack's full name, that takes up all the space allowed for the book, so story is writen--that is if Jack doesn't mind being called Papa. If you are reading, Jack, is the last part of Giampapa pronounced as we pronounce Papa, as in Daddy? I promise that you won't be hit with a paternity suit.
    Bly

  10. #10
    Gioacchino (Jack) Giampapa
    Guest

    Re: another word

    Bly:

    Although there are several long and complex translations for the name GIAMPAPA of of the simpelest is the literal meaning of 'already a father'. I learned of this when I was sixteen years old and it was not very comforting if you get my drift.
    To help you with the pronunciation it goes something like; Gee-am-papa. (Just like in daddy) Again, good luck.

    Gioacchino (Jack) Giampapa

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