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Thread: Senior Project

  1. #1
    Fenris Grey
    Guest

    Senior Project

    I'm not sure this is the right section to post this, but for my senior project, I chose to write and try to publish a short novel. One of the requirements for the project is to have a mentor who I can contact to ask questions, get advice, that kind of thing. So if anyone is interested, please reply to this. Thanks for at least looking!



  2. #2
    Smiling Curmudgeon
    Guest

    Re: Senior Project

    Fenris,

    You may get more replies if you provide a bit more information.

    Are you a senior in high school or college?

    What genre is your tale?

    How long is it? In words, not pages.

    Have you written it, or are you beginning to now?

    Etc.

    Cur

  3. #3
    Fenris Grey
    Guest

    Re: Senior Project

    That is a very good point, sorry.

    I'm a senior in high school. My novel is probably going to be contemporary fiction. I'm just starting to write it, I'm supposed to be starting something new for this, not finishing an old project. I'm not sure how long it's going to be yet, but I'm guessing somewhere between sixty and eighty thousand words.

  4. #4
    Sam English
    Guest

    Re: Senior Project

    This is in no way trying to discourage you, but it will be virtually impossible to craft a novel ready to present to agents by May (if that's how much time you have.) An 80,000-word novel can take months to year(s) to even outline, never mind finish a first draft. Then there's the editing, polishing, editing some more, polishing, etc. You can certainly string together that many words in a couple of months but if the assignment is to truly get something agent-ready and submit it, you've got a tough row to hoe.
    Good luck, though.

  5. #5
    Sam Fletcher
    Guest

    Re: Senior Project

    I agree with Sam English. I try to write 1,000 words per day, five days per week. If you follow that pattern then it would take you 112 days just to write the first draft. That's an extremely optimistic projection because I sometimes take a couple of weeks off in order to solidify the direction I want to go in my own mind. But suppose you could do it in 112 days, that's still approximately 4 months of writing to do the first draft of a novel that is due in May.

    My advice would be to shoot for 50,000 words instead. That will certainly be challenging enough and will be a good first step toward learning the discipline of writing. If you finish that then you can learn more about the publishing side of what it takes to be an author.

    I'm willing to give you some basic advice on writing . (No more than 30 minutes per week.) Send an email to the address in my profile if you can't find anyone else.

  6. #6
    Janice W-D
    Guest

    Re: Senior Project

    People write the first draft of a 50,000-or-more-words novel in 30 days every November for NaNoWriMo. Most of them are adults. A teenager doesn't hold down a full-time job, raise kids, work on a relationship with a spouse or do an abundance of housework. Yes, they have to attend school about 7 hours a day but they can work on extra projects during study hall, after school and on weekends. In other words, the typical teenager has more time to write than the typical adult.

    Revising and polishing a novel to the point of being publishable does take a lot more time and effort but the assignment, as presented to us, is to "try" to get the novel published.

    Good luck with your project, Fenris. Sorry I can't help but I stay snowed under with leading two critique groups, directing annual contests and squeezing in my own writing.

    NaNo has a lot of forums that you can read to get tips on banging out your first draft quickly. Some people revise as they go, others don't revise anything until the first draft is completed. With a bit of trial and effort, you'll figure out what proves most productive for you.

    [b]National Novel Writing Month[b]
    <http://www.nanowrimo.org/>

    Best,
    Janice

  7. #7
    Janice W-D
    Guest

    Re: Senior Project

    ... trial and error, not trial and effort.

    Janice

  8. #8
    Fenris Grey
    Guest

    Re: Senior Project

    Thanks for your tips and support and everything! I think in a couple days, I'll randomly choose someone from whoever's offered to help.

  9. #9
    Smiling Curmudgeon
    Guest

    Re: Senior Project

    Janice,

    You wrote "With a bit of trial and effort, you'll figure out what proves most productive for you."

    Then you wrote, "... trial and error, not trial and effort."

    Far as I'm concerned, you were dead on the first time!



    Cur

  10. #10
    Joe Zeff
    Guest

    Re: Senior Project

    Get a copy of No Plot? No Problem! by Chris Baty, founder of NaNoWriMo. It has a complete plan on how to write a 50,000 word first draft in only 30 days, starting with nothing but a situation, some characters and a rough idea of where you want it to go. That gives you a couple of months for editing and polishing before it has to be turned in. Good luck!

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